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Life and Work with Lara Schulte

Today we’d like to introduce you to Lara Schulte.

Thanks for sharing your story with us Lara. So, let’s start at the beginning and we can move on from there.
For over a decade, I worked in the corporate world consulting with business owners and C-level executives to bring their business objectives and sales goals to fruition. The “corporate world” was a world I understood all too well and spent years plugged into the constant hustle-and-bustle of fast-paced, competitive sales environments. Although highly regarded as a top performing executive throughout my career I could not ignore a feeling that I was meant for more. My true happiness came from mentoring colleagues, who saw came to me as a resource for growth in their own career. In 2015, as this realization that inspired me to become certified as a professional life and business coach. I initially started working with businesses in leadership and team training, and individuals in career counseling. Then, my first son, Sawyer was born, and it was time to pivot my business again. Having the realization that motherhood is something so transformative, I knew my work would be most impactful and my voice most authentic if I was talking and working directly with Moms. Now, I talk to today’s modern-day mom via my podcast and online mama community Generation. Mom with my business partner, co-host and good mama friend Jenn Rout.

We’re always bombarded by how great it is to pursue your passion, etc. – but we’ve spoken with enough people to know that it’s not always easy. Overall, would you say things have been easy for you?
Life is not a straight line. I learned this over the past handful of years. Having been fortunate to have a life that felt like a straight line for so long, life was disrupted a lot starting my late twenties. After I was married, my husband and I bought a home. Shortly after the purchase of that home, unplanned, we both quit our high-paying, secure jobs to pursue the life of entrepreneurship. Then, we realized that that home we had purchased had some major problems and ended up nearly losing over six-figures in a three-year litigation battle. Having put our entire life savings into our home we were devastated, and very stressed. We had no idea the outcome and we just wanted to feel secure in our personal lives and business, and at the time nothing felt secure. We also really wanted to start a family and unfortunately suffered a miscarriage with my first pregnancy. So, we were in great debt in our pockets and in our hearts for a long period of time.

Being an entrepreneur, our personal lives bleed into our professional lives and circumstance definitely affected our motivation. Rather than dwelling on the circumstance, we took charge of what was happening in our lives. I spent years seeking out information as to how I could be the best coach, how I could give back to others. I focused on that and believed everything else would fall into place. And it did. Eventually, I became pregnant, eventually my husbands business took off, eventually, my business evolved into a place that felt really natural and brought me happiness, eventually, our legal battle ended and we sold our house and purchased a new house in a community we love. It all worked out, but it surely was not easy. Now, when faced with a challenge, I look at it as an opportunity to grow, shift and change. Instead of focusing on “why me”, I focus on how this challenge is serving me. You’ve got to remember that when it comes to the unexpected, when it comes to the hard, that life is working for us, it’s not happening to us. Be grateful for each moment because those moments are your journey, and the journey is the best part.

So, as you know, we’re impressed with Generation.Mom – tell our readers more, for example, what you’re most proud of and what sets you apart from others.
When I became a Mom I realized how different motherhood looked for my generation than from my mother’s generation. On average, metropolitan women today are having their first child around the age of 32, vs. in 1980 it was 22. This is a ten-year gap from one generation to the next! You don’t see that significant of a change with many things generation to generation. Women are having babies later in life, and therefore have careers and identities established that they have worked very hard for, for decades before having children. Then they have a baby and it is life changing in so many ways. They now have this new identity as “Mom”, but what about their old identity they worked so hard to create prior to having children? How can you manage to be both Mom and the individual? Additionally, this era of motherhood has the technology, something my mother’s generation did not have to the same degree. Due to the internet and the ability to work from anywhere many Mom’s are working rather than staying home solely with their children or they are managing careers while staying home with their children “the work from home, stay at home mom.” Plus, we have social media, so more women are able to share their journey of motherhood with a larger community. We are the Moms of the .com generation, which is where we came up with our name, Generation.Mom. And Generation.Mom was established so modern-day moms could navigate modern-day motherhood together.

At Generation.Mom, we’ve established a place where our voices can be heard and we can join in the journey of modern-day motherhood together. On our podcast, and in our online community we feature expert guest moms to help other mamas make motherhood easier and mamas with inspirational stories that help shift the perception of motherhood today. Additionally, we offer a candid voice and honest perspective on motherhood to help bridge the gap between what motherhood really feels like and what society has made it look like for so long. We believe motherhood can be a very isolating journey, but if we allow for our stories to be heard, and our vulnerabilities exposed we can come together and unite in motherhood, making it easier and more joyful for us all.

There’s a wealth of academic research that suggests that a lack of mentors and networking opportunities for women has materially affected the number of women in leadership roles. Smart organizations and industry leaders are working to change this, but in the meantime, do you have any advice for finding a mentor and building a network?
When I decided I wanted to go into coaching and leave the corporate world, I spent an entire year making sure that was the route I wanted to take. I did a little bit every day to confirm coaching was right for me before giving up a career I was already successful in. Whether it was reading books or blogs, or listening to podcasts I made sure that at least 5 minutes each day was spent dedicated to moving towards the direction I felt my heart was being pulled. I set a date for myself and said, “if, by this date, this is something that still piques my interest I will pursue this as my career.” I called, email and direct messaged hundreds of coaches during this period of time to get a sense of what the business was really like and how they “made it.” Surprisingly a lot of people would not give me their time, but the ones who did were so impactful on my life and ultimate decision, so talk to anyone who is willing to talk to you! I was curious about anyone who would give me 5 minutes of their time. I did my research before meeting them whether I thought they would really be beneficial to talk to or not. I made sure they knew I was serious. There are a few I talked to during this time and simply just asked for an “informational interview” that will be a part of my life forever. Additionally, I provided them value always. I always asked them “how can I help you?” Still to this day, as I build my network around Generation.Mom, I always ask the Moms in our community and the Moms we have on the show “How can we further support you?” I keep in mind that the more I give, truly the more I receive. Even if it is not immediate reciprocation, somehow I always “gain” from what I do for others. I also always express my gratitude to others and how they have made a difference in my life and business.

Contact Info:

  • Website: www.generation.mom
  • Email: contact@generation.mom
  • Instagram: @laraschulte @generation.mom
  • Facebook: @imagenerationmom

      Image Credit:
Rachel Esther Tate & Emily Taplin

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